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Blog2020-10-28T15:29:04-04:00
1401, 2022

FSA/FTC (My humble opinion & sarcasm from analysis of the final rule)

January 14th, 2022|Categories: Criminal Justice and Prison Reform|Tags: , , , , |

I had a chance to dissect the Rule released yesterday and a have a few comments about what caught my eye from a BOP correctional treatment perspective. While the final rule is a lot broader in application and liberal as far as the actual awards of FTC, let us not be dancing on the tables because it’s still discriminatory and restrictive to a lot of PEOPLE. One of the stats that caught my eye was that approximately 75,000 of 131,000 PEOPLE (almost 60 %) are medium and high risk and simply are not eligible for the FTC!  While that number sounds high already, it doesn’t even take into consideration the minimum and low risk individuals that do not meet the other restrictive criteria of identified crimes, prior offenses, non-citizens, DC Code cases, etc. You can stay up on the table celebrating dancing if your part of the white-collar lobby or [...]

1301, 2022

Federal Good Time Credits ( SH#@s Getting Real)

January 13th, 2022|Categories: Criminal Justice and Prison Reform|Tags: , , , , |

Federal Time Credits (FTC) Questions I have for the DOJ/BOP:   Are people only being awarded for completing an evidenced based recidivism reduction program (EBRRP) IF a “need” was identified and keyed into that area on the computerized assessment? Are people awarded the FTC if their crime of conviction is NOT on the list of the crimes Congress excluded from receiving the credits, but the crime is determined violent or a “director’s discretion case”, under BOP policy? Are productive activities going to be expanded to include work assignments other than UNICOR and regimented activities such as art, recreation and leisure/sports leagues.  For instance, a person assigned as a companion for the institution suicide watch program should be awarded time as a “productive activity”.  The July 2021 National Catalogue seems sparse in the productive activities section, and the listed productive activities resemble more of brief programs. How do the hours awarded [...]

501, 2022

THE FTC/FSA SAGA IS COMMING TO A HEAD

January 5th, 2022|Categories: Criminal Justice and Prison Reform|Tags: , , , , |

I wanted to get this out in the metaverse because it is either profound or a profound snafu by the BOP. As everyone waited for the Federal Time Credits (FTC) Rules (see attached) to be published in less than two weeks, BOP facilities began putting talking points on the unit bulletin boards which is a standard protocol when a major policy or change in policy is effectuated. I receive all kinds of documents from around the BOP from various sources and this one caught my eye and allowed me to re-think the concept of the FTC application and statutory authority on how and where it is awarded. After receiving it, I was equally intrigued when a DC Judiciary contact involved in this process was unaware the rules were even finalized. After digging a bit further, I discovered that the talking points and policy were quickly retracted shortly after posting. All [...]

2212, 2021

It’s only the low hanging fruit!

December 22nd, 2021|Categories: Criminal Justice and Prison Reform|Tags: , , , , , , |

This is going to be a short, spontaneous rant with the catalyst being the newly announced DOJ- AG interpretation regarding the CARES ACT! Surprise, surprise; PEOPLE are not coming back to prison. For the few of you who follow my rants, I am on record in the early part of Covid clearly indicating the CARES ACT participants were not going to return. While I applaud the AG, I’m not going to jump on the bandwagon until he moves from the low hanging fruit and to the myriad of reforms which can be done almost immediately with leadership by pressuring  the BOP to evolve into the twentieth century. I am not talking about recreating the wheel through legislation so the DC politicians and NGO Mafia can raise even more money in the name of reform under the exploitative prison industrial complex.  I am referring to the need for the accountability, transparency [...]

1611, 2021

Go Figure! (It’s about time BOP corruption and incompetence is addressed externally)

November 16th, 2021|Categories: Criminal Justice and Prison Reform|Tags: , , , , |

My rants are usually triggered from media stories written as if the subject matter is some profound eureka moment  on an issue BOP insiders have lamented for decades. Enter the AP story from November 14, “ Workers at federal prisons are committing some of the crimes”. Workers at federal prisons are committing some of the crimes (apnews.com) I’ve been an advocate for outside BOP leadership going back to the Clinton Administration when rumors circulated that a person from outside the agency was being considered for the Director position which was eventually filled by Kathleen Hawk Sawyer. Even back then, there was a quickly deteriorating leadership culture manifesting  like a slow cancerous disease partly because of agency cultural factors exacerbated by unprecedented prison population growth due to the Sentencing Reform Act. These factors set the foundation for the proliferation of sub-standard leaders which have  manifested into  several issues  which have flown [...]

2207, 2021

Theatre & exploitation when it is all about the treatment

July 22nd, 2021|Categories: Criminal Justice and Prison Reform|Tags: , , , |

I started to write this rant in late May but never finished my thoughts as they became a bit too judgmental as well as complicated encompassing two different reform themes. I set it aside until another trigger (i.e.: idiocy) would force it to the surface. Yesterday I was reading an article about the Biden administration’s agreement on the DOJ’s interpretation of the CARES ACT  which will require people on home detention to eventually return to prison. While I highly doubt their return will ever come to fruition, it was the use of the term “non-violent” which set me off. I am disgusted at advocates who frequently use the term “non-violent” especially because they make a living changing labels for what we call incarcerated people, yes people. Aside from the obvious legal and policy ambiguity of the term “violent”, a single act from decades ago can seal a person’s fate many [...]

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