Eureka – Outside the Box

Last week, I was invited by Kevin Ring to participate on a panel in the Capitol Building regarding the subject of “Compassionate Release”. FAMM was previewing a new video called 5 to Life” highlighting the many frustrations families feel while trying to navigate the Federal Bureau of Prisons for a terminally ill family member.  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z929XbFeoCw&feature=youtu.be

The video reinforces some of the more disturbing aspects of government bureaucracy and the BOP culture in general. The agency has very little compassion for people and families caught up in the American justice system. It was satisfying to participate in the panel discussion after the viewing to repeat my mantra about how many Federal prison reform initiatives can be accomplished internally, without legislation through leadership under the existing policy framework. It might sound simplistic; but leadership, accountability, transparency and a broader application of policy can lead to significant reforms.

It was delightful to hear Judge Gertner, who was interviewed in the video, speak about the “broadening” of policy. Though the BOP does hold all the cards, it’s when they decide to deal them which is fundamental to the equation. One of the points I made during the Q & A was about how the BOP historically tracks and set deadlines for all types of programs and paperwork activities. Going all the way back to the 80’s, I had to process and complete International Treaty Transfer applications (which include extensive paperwork) within 30 days of someone’s request. The BOP still does not mandate a processing time for Compassionate release requests and only recently developed computer tracking assignments after being pressured by Congressional hearings and reports like “The Answer is No” by FAMM and Human Rights Watch. Despite the public attention, pressure and policy changes, compassionate release approvals continue at a snail’s pace. In addition, the BOP continues to deny applications at various levels without providing a completed application to the sentencing court with their recommendation for the final determination. That means the sentencing Judge’s authority is usurped by the agency.

One of the more salient points I made was the Bureau of Prisons is a top/down, quasi-like militaristic agency which operates by internal memoranda via the chain of command. If the BOP Director made the decision to accelerate the process and make CR requests a priority; it would literally happen overnight. In one computer transaction, the BOP can even run a national roster of terminally ill people and take an even more proactive stance on the issue to better facilitate requests. With the shortage of Federal medical center beds, statements by a former BOP Director about medical staffing at crisis levels and yearly cost estimates at upwards of $60,000 a year at taxpayer expense, why would the agency not better facilitate the ability of people to die at home with dignity? Most incarcerated, terminally ill people are NOT a public safety risk given their medical condition and fact the CR program requires they are confined to home detention by electronic monitoring technology under the supervision of a United States Probation officer.

This leads to my “eureka” moment. During the panel, an audience member asked why the BOP is such an obstructionist agency when it comes to this process. I found myself answering the question from a BOP mentality having worked for decades in that culture.  I basically replied the BOP’s primary mission is to “protect the public”. That is the very first thing agency administrators espouse at internal training sessions, staff orientation and the public. Correctional treatment and to a lesser extent, “compassion”, are simply second fiddle. Bureaucrats err on the side of caution and seldom think or act outside the box because they are afraid of a Willie Horton type event. That night I woke in the middle of the night and a thought came to me which is probably too far outside the box for most to comprehend, especially BOP administrators.

What if the BOP culture put correctional treatment and human dignity on equal footings with security? What if their training not only put equal emphasis on these concepts but also allocated equal resources as well? BOP Wardens and other administrators use the example of success by the number of escapes because an escaped person is a public safety risk. So I argue (tongue in cheek but just to make the point) that even if diminished resources for custodial/security purposes resulted in the increase of an escape now and then; it would dwarf the current public risk and costs we currently have by releasing people to communities without providing adequate correctional treatment by way of education, vocation, counseling and humane treatment.

In my humble opinion, issues like CR will not change until outside leadership prioritizes correctional treatment and is held more accountable to the tax paying public by responsiveness and transparency. Changes need to be made within the agency culture and it can start with the better education and involvement of House Judiciary members who control the purse strings for the agency budget. While the BOP has grown more immune to the press, they jump through hoops when they feel their budget is in jeopardy.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Footnote:  I was able to write this article without using the word “inmate”. Rather than spending time and resources deciding and changing what we call the incarcerated, I find the word “people” can be substituted in virtually every situation given the context!  Try it next time!

 

 

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jackatie

I've been helping people incarcerated in Feeral Prison for the past 30 years. I retired from the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) in 2011, after a 23 year career in case management related capacities. I was fortunate enough to work in the trenches of the system directly with diverse populations including Minimum, Low, Medium, High, Administrative and Witness Security cases. I held assignments in the Philadelphia Regional Office and the New York City Community Corrections Office. I participated in national policy writing workgroups and audited facilities throughout the Northeast United States as institution resources staff with the D.C. Central Office Program Review Division. I received dozens of awards during my tenure, three of which involved national recognition. Prior to my Federal Service, I worked in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as a Probation/Parole Officer and served our country for 8 years as a Military Policeman in the Army. Upon my retirement, I founded My Federal Prison Consultant, LLC and provide consulting services to law firms and offenders throughout the United States. I am passionate about Federal prison Reform and serve on the Corrections Committees for the American Bar Association and the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers. I have testified on Capital Hill on prison reform and I am the sub-chair of an ABA Committee on federal correctional issues. I am the Director of Programs and Case management Services for the non-profit organization FedCURE, and Executive Director of Out4Good developing the “Correcting Corrections in America” initiative. I teach Criminal Justice at Marywood University as a Lecturer. My latest venture is a Collaboration with Walt Pavlo under the "Prisonology" Brand. We are excited to have assembled a collation of people who have served time along side people who have worked in the trenches of the system. We have trained Federal Defenders, CJA Panel and even Federal Judges throughout the country on federal prison issues. I have been quoted in Forbes.com , Bloomberg News and CNBC and have appeared on television and radio. I hold a BA in Sociology/Anthropology and a Master of Science degree in Criminal Justice. You can be assured that no one has a better pulse on the policy, culture and nuances of the Federal Prison System.

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